Is Insomnia A Symptom Of Als

By | May 31, 2017

Sleep Better with These 5 Natural Sleep Remedies

Is falling asleep a struggleé Can't sleepat nighté It needn't be. Find out how you could sleep better naturallywith these 5 subtle changes to your bedtime routine.Stay tuned. Many of the bedtime rituals habits thatwe've established for ourselves are not conducive to getting a good night's rest.How you feel the next day during your waking hours hinges greatly on how well you sleep.By learning how to avoid common sleep enemies trying out a variety of healthy sleeppromotingtechniques, you'll eventually develop your personal routine to a good night's sleep.Let's take a look at how we can accomplish

this by creating your magical hour beforelights out. The solution to falling asleep quickly gettinga restful sleep does not boil down to just one thing or strategy.I wish it were that simple. It's a combination of factors or positivehabits that you gradually introduce into your current sleep routine over time thatsend you into lala land faster. In essence you're layering several strategieson top of each other in order to augment accelerate the positive sleep effect.With the goal of getting a restful sleep that recharges the body, clears the mind decreasesyour morning fatigue, let's take a look at

those 5 natural sleep remedies.But before I do that allow me to take a moment to explain the role of melatonin productionin establishing your body's natural sleepwake cycle.Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure.Your brain secretes more of it in the evening when it's dark to make you sleepy.And less during the day when it's light out you'd like to stay awake alert.So let's see how you could naturally increase your melatonin levels by making a few subtlechanges to your sleep routine. Here are those 5 strategies to incorporateinto your magical hour before lights out:

Strategy 1 is to turn off all light emittingelectronic devices at least an hour before bedtime.This includes your TV, computer, tablet smart phone.Many of us watch TV or work on the computer to relax at the end of the day.This is a big mistake right before bedtime. Not only does the light suppress your naturalmelatonin production, but these devices actually electrically stimulate the mind rather thanrelaxing it. If your favorite TV show is late at night,consider recording it then viewing it earlier the next day.Strategy 2.

As an alternative to TV watching, try listeningto some soft music or a fiction audio book instead.The soft music helps to set a calming mood. And listening to an audio book can be relaxing.Just ensure that it's a fiction story that requires little cognitive analysis as opposedto a recording that may require excessive processing.Which brings us to strategy 3 Piggy backing off of the previous tip, readingprior to lights out is yet another sleep remedy to consider trying.Spending 15 to 30 minutes losing yourself in a good book can take your mind off theday's stressful events.

I love to unwind at the end of my day withmy Kindle reader. As a side note, avoid reading from a backlitdevice at night such as an iPad. Tablets emit light which suppresses your naturalproduction of melatonin. Using an eReader such as a Kindle which isnot backlit is a better choice. Not into readingéHow about spending some time doing some relaxation exercises or meditation to help calm the mindéOr how journaling in your personal diary jotting down either what you were grateful for thatday or a personal success story that brings about a sense of peace contentmentéStrategy 4.

What would happen if you didnt sleep Claudia Aguirre

In 1965, 17yearold high school student,Randy Gardner stayed award for 264 hours. That's 11 days to see howhe'd cope without sleep. On the second day, his eyes stopped focusing. Next, he lost the abilityto identify objects by touch. By day three, Gardner was moodyand uncoordinated. At the end of the experiment,he was struggling to concentrate, had trouble with shortterm memory,

became paranoid, and started hallucinating. Although Gardner recovered withoutlongterm psychological or physical damage, for others, losing shuteye can resultin hormonal imbalance, illness, and, in extreme cases, death. We're only beginning to understandwhy we sleep to begin with,

but we do know it's essential. Adults need seven to eight hoursof sleep a night, and adolescents need about ten. We grow sleepy due to signalsfrom our body telling our brain we are tired, and signals from the environmenttelling us it's dark outside. The rise in sleepinducing chemicals, like adenosine and melatonin,

send us into a light doze that grows deeper, making our breathing and heart rate slow down and our muscles relax. This nonREM sleep is when DNA is repaired and our bodies replenish themselvesfor the day ahead. In the United States, it's estimated that 30% of adultsand 66% of adolescents are regularly sleepdeprived.

This isn't just a minor inconvenience. Staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. When we lose sleep, learning, memory, mood, and reaction time are affected. Sleeplessness may also cause inflammation,

halluciations, high blood pressure, and it's even been linkedto diabetes and obesity. In 2014, a devoted soccer fan died after staying awake for 48 hours to watch the World Cup. While his untimely death was due to a stroke, studies show that chronically sleepingfewer than six hours a night increases stroke risk by four and half times

Tracking Molecular Clues to ALS

University of NebraskaLincoln Biochemist, Oleh Khalimonchuk took the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Here we go. But the research he does could lead to effective therapies for ALS and other degenerative diseases. ALS is a progressive disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, leading to

paralysis and eventually death. I don't know if we can find the cure but we can probably find the factor that prevents development of a disease, which is equally important. In the lab, Khalimonchuk studies tiny worms that have neurons similar to those attacked by the disease in humans. They are microscopic worms, FreeLiving worms,

really fun critters (chuckles). He's looking for clues, about the role played by Mitochondria, a powerhouse that generates the energy a cell needs to do it's job. We're interesting in likenesses of medical protection, so be what cells came up with to keep Mitochandria healthy and happy. Improperly functioning Mitochandria causes

damage that accumulates over time. Khalimonchuk's team linked a mutation in a protein called, OMA1 to ALS. We're trying to find the mechanisms that underlay this dysfunction, specifically the OMA1 dysfunction, in ALS or some other diseases as well. A 1.4 million dollar grant from the National Institute's of Health supports Khalimonchuk's work.

He says the research is exciting and gratifying. Since I was a grad student, I've been working in the Mitochandrial field so it's always something I've been passionate about. It's always fun to discover new things and if they can help people, it's even better. (gentle music).

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