Sleep Apnea Test Boston

By | May 4, 2018

Magnesium A Natural Way To Treat Constipation Insomnia and Muscle Tension

Magnesium is essential to life, period. Itjust is. It's one of the most prevalent minerals in the body. It's involved in over300 metabolic pathways in the body. You're never going to get adequate magnesium in amultivitamin. Magnesium is found in dark, leafy greens. Almonds are a really good sourceof magnesium. I have my patients supplement with magnesium because so many of the issuesthat I see are magnesiumrelated. Magnesium deficiency can cause leg cramps and migraines.Insomnia from a lack of magnesium is a really common problem. Muscle tension can be causedby lack of magnesium and lots of my patients have muscle tension. They're just workingtoo hard. Magnesium will help with all of

those things. So I really like Natural Calmbrand. This is available everywhere such as Whole Foods and other health food stores.Natural Calm magnesium is so easy because the one thing about magnesium is it's kindof a large molecule, so sometimes to get a good dose of pills, you kind of have to takelike, three or four pills and nobody likes taking… I mean, some people are just pillpeople, and that's totally fine, but most of my patients are like, “No more pills.�It's like, they totally are just, “No more pills.� With Natural Calm magnesiumI have my patients do about a teaspoon in water before bed, and they just kind of worktheir way up in dosage. There are different

flavors. I think the raspberry lemonade tastesbetter. It kind of makes a little fizzy drink, but you could make it as a tea as well. Thisis just magnesium citrate. Some people are a little bit sensitive to magnesium if theytend towards diarrhea; if their stools are looser, magnesium can really accelerate that.On the flip side, if a person has had chronic constipation issues, this is typically theirMecca. And the other thing to say is that magnesium can drop blood pressure, so peoplewho are already really hypotensive, careful with taking too much at once. You really justwant to kind of break up your doses throughout the day, and you can add sea salt to the dietto kind of bring up the blood pressure if

the blood pressure's too low. But I thinkthat magnesium is really wonderful. The only other place to really caution with magnesiumis if people have kidney damage. It's actually really helpful for kidney stones, but if peoplehave kidney damage, like they're on dialysis, that is a place where they would need to checkwith their physician, but otherwise, I love magnesium across the board. You had a questionon magnesium. So her comment was that she had heard all of the beneficial health thingsabout magnesium, but she was also told that it really helps just keep the colon clean,and it does. I mean, if you dose up with magnesium the same way as if you dose up with vitaminC, you will really promote a looser stool.

The higher up you go, you will just see adirect effect, so it does help you clean out constantly. So in terms of a gentle detoxon a regular basis, magnesium will keep your bowels moving. Depending on your body typeI recommend taking 400 milligrams to 1,000 milligrams of magnesium per day. Start witha teaspoon of Natural Calm magnesium. Make sure you tolerate that, and then just workyour way up. So basically start with 150 milligrams and just kind of inch your way up and makesure you're tolerating the amount without diarrhea. Most of my patients take 600 milligramseasily in a sitting, but it's better to kind of start slow and work your way up.

Sleep Studies for Kids at The Childrens of Philadelphia

MUSIC PLAYING gt;gt; WELCOME TO THE SLEEP LABAT THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA. YOU ARE HERE FOR A SLEEPSTUDY WHICH IS ALSO KNOWN AS A POLYSOMNOGRAM. A SLEEP STUDY IS ANOVERNIGHT TEST TO SEE WHAT YOUR BODY DOESWHILE IT IS ASLEEP. WHEN YOU AND YOUR PARENTCOME TO THE SLEEP LAB,

YOU WILL BE MET BY OURSTAFF AT THE FRONT DESK. MUSIC PLAYING gt;gt; YOUR TECHNICIAN WILL BETHE PERSON WHO HELPS YOU GET READY FOR YOUR SLEEPSTUDY AND WILL MONITOR YOU OVERNIGHT. THEY WILL INTRODUCETHEMSELVES WHEN YOU ARRIVE AT THE SLEEP LAB. THEY WILL ALSO TAKEYOUR HEIGHT AND WEIGHT.

OUR TECHNICIAN WILL ASK YOURMOM OR DAD A FEW QUESTIONS, YOUR NAME, DATE OF BIRTH,AND INSURANCE INFORMATION. THEY WILL ALSO ASK IF YOUNEED SPECIAL ASSISTANCE OVERNIGHT. PLEASE REMEMBER TO BRING ANYMEDICINES THAT YOU MAY NEED. SOME OF OURPATIENTS NEED MEDICINES, FEEDING SUPPLIESAND BREATHING EQUIPMENT FROM HOME.

WHEN YOU COME FORYOUR SLEEP STUDY, REMEMBER TO ALSO BRING SOMEOF YOUR FAVORITE THINGS FROM HOME SO YOU FEEL COMFORTABLEDURING YOUR SLEEPOVER AT CHOP. MOST OF OUR PATIENTS LIKE TOBRING THEIR FAVORITE PILLOW, STUFFED ANIMALS,PAJAMAS, OR DVD'S. MUSIC PLAYING gt;gt; ALL RIGHT MICHAEL,ARE YOU READYé

gt;gt; OK. gt;gt; OK. NOW WERE GOING TOSTART THE SETUP. gt;gt; OK. MUSIC PLAYING gt;gt; YOU WILL GET A SPECIALBELT ACROSS YOUR CHEST TO MONITOR YOUR BREATHING. YOU WILL ALSO GET STICKERSTO MONITOR YOUR BRAIN

AND HEART. TO TOP IT ALL OFF YOU'LL GETA SPECIAL LIGHT CAP TO KEEP EVERYTHING IN PLACEWHILE YOU ARE SLEEPING. SOME OF YOUR STICKERS MAYFALL OFF IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, SO YOURTECHNICIAN MAY NEED TO COME IN SOMETIMESTO PUT THEM BACK ON. MUSIC PLAYING. gt;gt; WHEN YOU AREREADY, IT'S LIGHTS OUT.

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy for OSA Anesthetic Considerations by Denise Chan MD

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy for ObstructiveSleep Apnea: Anesthetic Considerations, by Denise Chan. Hello, my name is Denise Chan, and I'm a pediatricanesthesiologist at Boston Children's . Today, I'll be discussing important aspectsof taking care of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the perioperativesetting. Introduction. Now, first let's define what is obstructivesleep apnea syndrome. Well, it's a disorder of breathing during sleep, and it's characterizedby a few different things, according to the

American Thoracic Society. First of all, these patients have either prolongedupper airway obstruction, which is known as obstructive hypopnea, or intermittent completeobstruction, known as obstructive sleep apnea. And this occurs with or without snoring. Second, the patient exhibits moderate to severeoxygen desaturation. Third, normal ventilation is disrupted. And fourth, normal sleep patternsare disrupted. So these are the components of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Now, in children, obstructive sleep apneasyndrome is oftentimes caused by enlarged

adenoid or tonsillar tissue. And you can seein this illustration that the hypertrophied tonsils really do get in the way of normalairflow. So what do you expect to see in a patientwith this syndromeé First of all, you'll probably see snoring. They'll have difficulty breathingduring sleep, restless sleep, or even nightmares or night terrors. You may see excessive sweating.They may have nocturnal enuresis, or bedwetting, mouth breathing, pauses in breathing, or chronicrhinorrhea. More importantly, though, what is the significanceof having obstructive sleep apnea, and what are the consequences for the patienté Well,there are a number of problems that can occur.

Daytime somnolence patients have fallenasleep while driving older patients, of course and this can lead to motor vehicleaccidents; cognitive dysfunction, which leads to behavioral problems or problems with workor school performance; metabolic effects, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetesmellitus, or metabolic syndrome; or other metabolic effects, such as failure to thriveor stunted growth. Or if obstructive sleep apnea is more severeor left untreated, this could lead to cardiovascular morbidity, such as pulmonary or systemic hypertension,cor pulmonale, or stroke. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome can even lead to death. Andit's been hypothesized to be a factor contributing

to SIDS, or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.Diagnosis and al Features. In order to diagnose whether or not someonehas obstructive sleep apnea, you must first and foremost perform a thorough history andphysical exam. A sleep history screening for snoring should be a part of every child'sroutine health care visits. It's really unlikely that someone's goingto have obstructive sleep apnea if they don't snore. So if a child does snore, ask the parentsmore details about the sleep history. Does your child have difficulty breathing or stopbreathing during sleepé Or are you worried about their breathing at nighté Does yourchild sweat during sleepé Does your child

have restless sleepé Does he or she breathethrough his mouth while awakeé Has anyone in the family had obstructive sleep apneaor sudden infant death syndromeé Or does your child have behavioral problemsé When you examine the patient, you may noticecertain features that are suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea, such as a small, triangular chin,retrognathia, a high arched palate or a long soft palate, a long oval face, or, of course,large tonsils. There are also certain patients who are athigh risk for having obstructive sleep apnea. And these are patients with obesity; Downsyndrome; PraderWilli syndrome; certain neuromuscular

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