Types Of Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

By | March 22, 2017

Natural Treatments for Sleep Apnea

Hey, guys. Axe, here, of naturalmedicine and founder of DrAxe . In this tutorial, I'm going to go through a sevenstepprocess on how to overcome sleep apnea. If you struggle with sleep apnea, snoring, insomnia,just trouble sleeping at night, these tips are going to help you big time. The number one thing you've got to start doingif you want to overcome sleep apnea is look at your diet. Now, sometimes sleep apnea canbe related to weight gain. It can be related to inflammation in different areas of yourbody. But if you can follow these dietary tips, it's going to help tremendously.

The first thing you want to do is you reallywant to focus on supporting your metabolism. You want to focus on getting three thingsevery single meal: good quality protein, healthy fat, and fiber, those three things. Most peoplewith sleep apnea, most people tend to consume too many carbohydrates and too much sugar,which can actually affect your insulin levels and your metabolism, which causes sleep apnea.So again, healthy protein, such as bone broth protein, organic chicken and turkey, wildcaughtfish, grassfed beef, getting good quality protein is important. Number two, fiber, getting more vegetablesand fruits in your diet and wholesprouted

grains, such as brown rice, that's where youwant to get your fiber. The healthy fats, things like coconut oil, olive oil, organicnuts and seeds, those are some ways to get some good healthy fat in your diet. So again,focus on a healthy diet, a diet that's antiinflammatory and that helps balance out insulin levelsis going to be big when it comes to beating sleep apnea. Number two, there are certain things you wantto avoid. If you have sleep apnea, you want to avoid intake of alcohol, caffeine, smoking,and also you need to be aware of sedatives. If you're taking sedatives on a regular basis,that can really cause sleep apnea. Stay away

from those things. If you're saying to yourself,quot;Well, I'm still going to do caffeine and alcohol,quot; then what I would do is not do coffee.I would just do a little bit of tea, like a green tea during the day. So again, just tone it down some. The otherthing I would do is, if you're drinking alcohol, limit it to one glass. When you start doingmore than one glass, more than one beer, more than one glass of alcohol, that's really goingto affect your sleep cycle. And no more than two days a week. Again, bring the alcoholdown, because that will absolutely cause sleep apnea.

The number three tip is to treat acid reflux.Many people with sleep apnea have heartburn, GERD, or acid reflux, or some type of digestiveissue that's causing their sleep apnea. Now, the way to overcome that is to follow thesedietary tips. You want to eat smaller meals, so you don't want to overeat, and get moreorganic meat, vegetables, and fruits. You've got to be careful overconsuming thegrains, the pastas, the breads, the chips. All of those things will really cause acidreflux and sleep apnea. Also, supplementing with digestive enzymes, probiotics, and applecider vinegar. So probiotics, enzymes, and apple cider vinegar, all of those can helpin the natural treatment of acid reflux and

reduce sleep apnea. The number four thing you want to considerdoing to beat sleep apnea is getting a humidifier in your bedroom. Oftentimes, it's the humidityor being too dry in the bedroom that actually causes sleep apnea. So look into getting ahumidifier and sometimes an air purifier. So a humidifier, an air purifier, those thingscan actually help support your body and you breathing better and overcoming sleep apnea. Number five is your sleeping position. Manypeople with sleep apnea sleep on their back. Some of them sleep on their stomach. You wantto sleep on your side. What you want to do

Sleep stages and circadian rhythms Processing the Environment MCAT Khan Academy

Voiceover: Even thoughyou're not conscious during sleep, your brain is deceptively active. It goes through multiple cycles with distinct brain patterns, and it's very important to your ability to perform normal functionswhen you're awake. You have four main stages of sleep

which occur in approximately90 minute cycles during a normal night of sleep. The first three stages are all considered nonrapid eye movement, or nonREM which I'm going to abbreviate as N1, N2, and N3. N1 is the stage betweensleep and wakefulness. This is when your brainstarts producing theta waves.

You might experience strange sensations known as hypnagogic hallucinations, just kind of a fun name. These can include hearing or seeing things that aren't there such as seeing a flash of light, or a lot of people hearsomeone calling their name, or a phone ring, or a doorbell,

or something like that. Or if you've been doing something really repetitive just before bed, then that can recur inyour hypnagogic state. For example, if you'vebeen on a boat all day, you may still feel like you're on water when you drift off to sleep even if you're on dry land.

Or something that's actually called the Tretis effect, if you've been playing Tetris for a long time right before bed, then you might experience visual images of blocks or something all moving in the same direction kind of like the blocks in the game.

Another common feeling during this stage is a feeling of falling. That leads to what's called hypnic jerks, or those muscle twitchesyou sometimes experience as you fall asleep. So that's N1, our first,lightest stage of sleep. Then we move into N2 which is a slightly deeper stage of sleep.

To Sleep Perchance to Dream Crash Course Psychology 9

Comedian Mike Birbiglia was having troublewith sleep. Though not with the actual sleeping part onenight, while staying in a hotel, he dreamed that a guided missile was on its way to hisbed, and in his dream, he jumped out the window to escape it. Unfortunately, he also did this not in hisdream. From the second floor. And the window wasnot open. This little episode cost him 33 stitches anda trip to a sleep specialist. Mike now sleeps in zippedup mummy bags forhis own safety.

The lesson hereƩ Sleep is not some break timewhen your brain, or your body, just goes dormant. Far from it. In truth, sleep is just anotherstate of consciousness. And only in the past few decades have we begun to really plumbits depths from why we sleep in the first place, to what goes on in our brains whenwe do, to what happens when we can't sleep. And there is a lot that science has to sayabout your dreams! Talk about weird! It's like Sigmund Freudmeets Neil Gaiman. So, even though it may seem like you'redead to the world, when you sleep, your perceptual window remains slightly open.

And kinda like Mike Birbiglia's hotel roomwindow, a trip through it can make for a pretty wild ride. But for your safety and enjoyment, I'm hereto guide you through this state of consciousness, where you'll learn more than a few thingsabout human mind, including your own. And here's hoping you won't need any stitcheswhen we're through. INTRO Technically speaking, sleep is a periodic,natural, reversible and near total loss of consciousness, meaning it's different thanhibernation, being in a coma, or in say, an

anesthetic oblivion. Although we spend about a third of our livessleeping, and we know that it's essential to our health and survival, there still isn'ta scientific consensus for why we do it. Part of it probably has to do with simplerecuperation, allowing our neurons and other cells to rest and repair themselves. Sleepalso supports growth, because that's when our pituitary glands release growth hormones,which is why babies sleep all the time. Plus, sleep has all kinds of benefits for mentalfunction, like improving memory, giving our brains time to process the events of the day,and boosting our creativity.

But even if we're not quite sure of allthe reasons why we sleep, technology has given us great insight into how we sleep. And for that we can thank little Armond Aserinsky.One night in early 1950s Chicago, eightyearold Armond was tucked into his bed by his father.But this night, instead of getting a kiss on the forehead, little Armond got some electrodestaped to his face. Armond's dad was Eugene Aserinsky, a gradstudent looking to test out a new electroencephalograph, or EEG machine, that measures the brain'selectrical activity. That night, as his son slept peacefully, hewatched the machine go bonkers with brain

wave patterns, and after making sure thathis machine wasn't somehow broken discovered that the brain doesn't just quot;power downquot;during sleep, as most scientists thought. Instead, he had discovered the sleep stagewe now call REM or rapid eye movement, a perplexing period when the sleeping brain is buzzingwith activity, even though the body is in a deep slumber. Aserinsky and his colleague Nathaniel Kleitmanwent on to become pioneers of sleep research. Since then, sleep specialists armed with similartechnology have shown that we experience four distinct stages of sleep, each defined byunique brainwave patterns.

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