What Causes Insomnia

By | January 28, 2018

Trouble in Bed When Sleep Turns Against Us

Say you've been napping, like between classes, or after a long night out, or, I don't know, after broadcasting on YouTube for 48 straight hours to raise money for charity. Now, imagine you waking up, and suddenly you discover that you can't move. You want to speak, but you can't; you're mind is acutely aware of what's happening, but you are powerless to get your body to do anything. It may last a few seconds, it may last a few minutes, in rare cases it can last more than an hour it's called Sleep Paralysis and you might not have to imagine it

because up to 40% of us have experienced this sleep disorder at some point in our lives. I am one of them. We don't like to think about the bad things that can go on while we're in dreamland just as we hate the disorders that keep us from even falling asleep Hello, Insomnia. But even though we've talked a lot on this show about the science of sleep Why we need it Why we dream

and where dreams come from. There is a whole other polymorphously messed up realm of human biology that explains what happens when sleeps turns against us. We can't turn our brains off. We forget to breathe. We have waking hallucinations. Some of us even walk, eat, run, and have entire conversations when we're asleep. The halfasleep brain is a crazy place

and once you understand it, you may never see the back of your eyelids the same way again. (intro music) When most people think of the things that cramp our sleep style they think, Insomnia. But defining, diagnosing, and treating this most common sleep disorder can be tricky. In fact, for a long time, most scientists considered insomnia to be a symptom of another problem like depression, anxiety, asthma, stress, substance abuse, a traumatic injury even jetlag Though, today, insomnia is considered by many to be a chronic disease of its own

that interacts with other medical conditions So, if you've ever had prolonged trouble falling asleep, or staying asleep but you don't have any other health issues then s would probably say that you have Primary Insomnia. If you do have something else going on, like a physical or psychological condition then you've got Secondary Insomnia. And most cases of Secondary Insomnia are chronic meaning it lasts for more than a month.

There are also cases of Acute or shortterm Insomnia which is usually triggered by stress or some specific life event Whatever the cause scientists believe these Insomnias are the result of the simple but eternal struggle between arousal and sleepiness. More and more research is suggesting that a condition known as HyperArousal where the nervous system remains in a constant state of alert may be the main reason for chronic insomnia.

Insomnia Webinar Causes and Beating Insomnia Naturally

Okay, well, welcome, everyone. This is Nik Hedberg, and tonight we're talking about sleep disorders. And this one of my favoritetopics, just because it's something that I encounter a lot in practice. Many, many peoplehave issues with sleep, many chronically people. And it's really one of those fundamental thingsthat it's just very difficult to help someone get healthy when they're not getting a goodnight's sleep. Sleep is when your body repairs itself; it'swhen your body releases the greatest amount of growth hormone; it's when a lot of yourneurotransmitters in the brain, like serotonin, dopamine, etc. are restored and regeneratedwhile you're sleeping. Sleeping, of course,

reduces stress, and it's definitely becominga bigger and bigger problem in today's society for a variety of reasons. So tonight we're going to talk about threedifferent types of sleep disorders that we see. People can have one of these types, orthey can have a mixed type. But we have pretty good success getting people to sleep oncewe figure out what kind of type they are and what they do well on. Then, of course, theunderlying cause. So, these are really the main things thatreally cause sleep disruption, stress is obviously going to be number one. Stress raises cortisollevels, and then cortisol, when it's high,

that will prevent you from sleeping. And thenof course caffeine, coffee, black tea, chocolate, things like that. Caffeine, of course, stimulatesthe thyroid and the adrenal glands, giving you a false sense of energy. But there isa price to pay when you do consume caffeine for energy. Sugar and of course poor dietary choices,blood sugar imbalances. And one of the things that happens when you sleep is you're actuallyin a fasting state, a very long fast, up to six to eight hours on average. And so whenyou're fasting, your body has to maintain a stable blood sugar level, and if you'rebody is not able to do that, that's mainly

regulated by the liver, the pancreas and theadrenal glands. If you're body is not able to do that, regulate blood sugar while you'reasleep, that can wake you up. We'll talk a little bit more about that later. Light in the bedroom, and that can be anything,like from a clock radio, street lights coming in, computer lights, things like that, anykind of light. Even though your eyes are closed, the brain still picks up on light in the room,and that will disrupt your sleep. Lack of exercise, chronic infections, food sensitivities.Really the big food sensitivities are going to be gluten, dairy, corn, soy, and eggs.

A magnesium deficiency, because magnesiumhas an overall calming effect on the nervous system, the brain and the muscular system.Just kind of relaxes everything. And television, watching television in bed,watching violence or traumatic movies or shows before bed, all of these things can contributeto sleep disruption. You would also want to add in there sex hormoneimbalances, especially in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. When progesteronelevels begin to drop, that can make it more difficult to get a good night's sleep. So let's begin with the Type 1 sleep disorder.This is going to be the most common type of

sleep disorder out there. This is mainly aserotonin or melatonin deficiency. So melatonin is the hormone produced in the brain thatreally puts you to sleep. Serotonin is the precursor to melatonin. The reason that people become depleted inserotonin and melatonin is basically due to chronic inflammation. So it's matter of figuringout where the inflammation is coming from. This can be genetic, these people tend tobe the worrier, always worrying about things, and these people will typically either havedifficulty falling asleep, and or staying asleep.

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