Is There A Cure For Sleep Deprivation

By | April 28, 2018

Natural Cures for Insomnia

Hey guys, Axe here from DrAxe . Oneof the most common things I'll hear from my patients, is they'll say, quot; Axe, I can'tsleep.quot; And if you're one of those people that have trouble falling asleep, or strugglewith insomnia, or you wake up during the night, that's very common. In this tutorial I'm goingto go through the exact steps you need to follow to get better quality of sleep andto help you fall asleep fast. Step number one in overcoming sleep deprivationis to change your diet, surprisingly. And, for a lot of people, their diets are keepingthem from falling asleep. Before you go to bed, you need to really drop your carbohydrateconsumption. If you're consuming too many

sugars and carbs, your body is burning those,it's getting warm. And so, lowering that sugar, and grain intake, and carbohydrate intakebefore bed is important. And get some good quality fats before you go to bed. Somethinglike an avocado is a great food to actually help you fall asleep at night, either avocadoor some organic yogurt. So again, avocado and organic yogurt, are the best foods tohelp you naturally fall asleep. The reason they work is those foods are high in magnesiumand potassium. Magnesium and potassium are two crucial nutrients you need to help relaxthe body and to help you fall asleep at night. So remember avocado and yogurt, the top twofoods you can consume just a little bit here

or there in the evening that will help youfall asleep at night. The second step you need to do to overcomeinsomnia is to reduce stress. And for most people, along with diet, this is the big thingthat's keeping you up at night, is your mind starts racing, you keep thinking and you can'tshut your brain off. And there are several reasons for that. One, is you watched TV upuntil the point that you went to bed. That visual stimulus you're watching constantly,especially the blue light, and that doesn't just include the TV screen, it also includesyour computer, your iPad, or your phone. And that light is blue light, which actually tellsyour pineal gland in your brain that it actually

needs to keep running, so it messes with yourcircadian rhythms and cortisol levels. It keeps you from falling asleep at night whenyou were looking at that bright blue light in the computer screens and TV screens. So,about 30 minutes at least, ideally, an hour, but at least 30 minutes before bed, you needto shut off all electronics, and you need to start reading something that helps yourelax. Or start journaling. So you can get out ajournal and start writing things down. You can look at your schedule for the next dayand write that down. But I really recommend reading a novel that you enjoy, reading adevotional, your Bible, or just something

that helps you relax and wind down at least30 minutes before bed. And that's going to help, and in general reducing stress. And if you have something that's really stressingyou out, that's keeping you from sleeping at night, I recommend you start writing downthose things that stress you out. Work on addressing those the best you can, and thenstart scheduling things into the week that you love to do. It is so important. If you'vehad a great day, and you've been happy all day, it actually creates certain hormonesin your body known as endorphins that actually help you fall asleep at night. So actually,having a good mood throughout the day can

help improve your sleep at night. So stepnumber two, shut down the computers and read a book before bed. As well as just add somejoy into your life. Reduce stress; it's very important for falling asleep at night. Step number three, is take quality supplements,especially a magnesium supplement. And taking a magnesium supplement, about 400 to 500mga night before bed, can help you naturally reduce stress, and really improve sleep. Andso I recommend a high quality magnesium chelate or magnesium citrate before bed. So takinga magnesium supplement can help you fall asleep. Also supplements like melatonin can help,or valerian root. But I don't recommend doing

Sleep deprivation disparities in health economic and social wellbeing Lauren Hale at TEDxSBU

Good morning! OK. Raise your hand if you did not get enough sleep last night. There are many possible reasons for this. Maybe you were up late at night because you had a toddler screaming for you in the middle of the night. I know I did! Or maybe you were cranking away

on that final document for work or for school. Or maybe you just got sucked in to watching another episode of the Daily Show. OK. So now, raise your hand if you are regularly not functioning at your top game because of how you slept. OK. So as sleep deprived as we are, we are among the lucky ones.

I say that because to be here today you need to be affiliated with Stony Brook University. That tells me that you've had the opportunity to pursue higher education. Further, to be here you have to have the ability to make choices about how you spend your time, control over your life.

Imagine how much harder it would be for you to sleep and to function, if you didn't have that control over your own time. I know it's hard to put yourself in someone else's shoes, but imagine, for example, if you didn't have enough money to feed your children. How hard would it be for you to sleepé Or imagine if your crowded urban apartment

was too noisy, or too cold, or too unsafe for you to comfortably fall asleep at night. My goal today is to get you thinking about the social patterning of sleep, why some of us are sleeping worse than others and what the consequences are for society. In my research, I investigate the underlying causes and consequences of sleep deprivation

and sleep disorders. Today I'll share with you some of the results of my research and that of my colleagues. And I hope to convey to you why we, as individuals and as a society, should be deeply concerned about how we sleep and what we can do about it. So, for everybody, whether you're rich or poor,

What would happen if you didnt sleep Claudia Aguirre

In 1965, 17yearold high school student,Randy Gardner stayed award for 264 hours. That's 11 days to see howhe'd cope without sleep. On the second day, his eyes stopped focusing. Next, he lost the abilityto identify objects by touch. By day three, Gardner was moodyand uncoordinated. At the end of the experiment,he was struggling to concentrate, had trouble with shortterm memory,

became paranoid, and started hallucinating. Although Gardner recovered withoutlongterm psychological or physical damage, for others, losing shuteye can resultin hormonal imbalance, illness, and, in extreme cases, death. We're only beginning to understandwhy we sleep to begin with,

but we do know it's essential. Adults need seven to eight hoursof sleep a night, and adolescents need about ten. We grow sleepy due to signalsfrom our body telling our brain we are tired, and signals from the environmenttelling us it's dark outside. The rise in sleepinducing chemicals, like adenosine and melatonin,

send us into a light doze that grows deeper, making our breathing and heart rate slow down and our muscles relax. This nonREM sleep is when DNA is repaired and our bodies replenish themselvesfor the day ahead. In the United States, it's estimated that 30% of adultsand 66% of adolescents are regularly sleepdeprived.

This isn't just a minor inconvenience. Staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. When we lose sleep, learning, memory, mood, and reaction time are affected. Sleeplessness may also cause inflammation,

halluciations, high blood pressure, and it's even been linkedto diabetes and obesity. In 2014, a devoted soccer fan died after staying awake for 48 hours to watch the World Cup. While his untimely death was due to a stroke, studies show that chronically sleepingfewer than six hours a night increases stroke risk by four and half times

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