Narcolepsy Nightmares

By | March 24, 2017

Sleep Better with These 5 Natural Sleep Remedies

Is falling asleep a struggleé Can't sleepat nighté It needn't be. Find out how you could sleep better naturallywith these 5 subtle changes to your bedtime routine.Stay tuned. Many of the bedtime rituals habits thatwe've established for ourselves are not conducive to getting a good night's rest.How you feel the next day during your waking hours hinges greatly on how well you sleep.By learning how to avoid common sleep enemies trying out a variety of healthy sleeppromotingtechniques, you'll eventually develop your personal routine to a good night's sleep.Let's take a look at how we can accomplish

this by creating your magical hour beforelights out. The solution to falling asleep quickly gettinga restful sleep does not boil down to just one thing or strategy.I wish it were that simple. It's a combination of factors or positivehabits that you gradually introduce into your current sleep routine over time thatsend you into lala land faster. In essence you're layering several strategieson top of each other in order to augment accelerate the positive sleep effect.With the goal of getting a restful sleep that recharges the body, clears the mind decreasesyour morning fatigue, let's take a look at

those 5 natural sleep remedies.But before I do that allow me to take a moment to explain the role of melatonin productionin establishing your body's natural sleepwake cycle.Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure.Your brain secretes more of it in the evening when it's dark to make you sleepy.And less during the day when it's light out you'd like to stay awake alert.So let's see how you could naturally increase your melatonin levels by making a few subtlechanges to your sleep routine. Here are those 5 strategies to incorporateinto your magical hour before lights out:

Strategy 1 is to turn off all light emittingelectronic devices at least an hour before bedtime.This includes your TV, computer, tablet smart phone.Many of us watch TV or work on the computer to relax at the end of the day.This is a big mistake right before bedtime. Not only does the light suppress your naturalmelatonin production, but these devices actually electrically stimulate the mind rather thanrelaxing it. If your favorite TV show is late at night,consider recording it then viewing it earlier the next day.Strategy 2.

As an alternative to TV watching, try listeningto some soft music or a fiction audio book instead.The soft music helps to set a calming mood. And listening to an audio book can be relaxing.Just ensure that it's a fiction story that requires little cognitive analysis as opposedto a recording that may require excessive processing.Which brings us to strategy 3 Piggy backing off of the previous tip, readingprior to lights out is yet another sleep remedy to consider trying.Spending 15 to 30 minutes losing yourself in a good book can take your mind off theday's stressful events.

I love to unwind at the end of my day withmy Kindle reader. As a side note, avoid reading from a backlitdevice at night such as an iPad. Tablets emit light which suppresses your naturalproduction of melatonin. Using an eReader such as a Kindle which isnot backlit is a better choice. Not into readingéHow about spending some time doing some relaxation exercises or meditation to help calm the mindéOr how journaling in your personal diary jotting down either what you were grateful for thatday or a personal success story that brings about a sense of peace contentmentéStrategy 4.

To Sleep Perchance to Dream Crash Course Psychology 9

Comedian Mike Birbiglia was having troublewith sleep. Though not with the actual sleeping part onenight, while staying in a hotel, he dreamed that a guided missile was on its way to hisbed, and in his dream, he jumped out the window to escape it. Unfortunately, he also did this not in hisdream. From the second floor. And the window wasnot open. This little episode cost him 33 stitches anda trip to a sleep specialist. Mike now sleeps in zippedup mummy bags forhis own safety.

The lesson hereé Sleep is not some break timewhen your brain, or your body, just goes dormant. Far from it. In truth, sleep is just anotherstate of consciousness. And only in the past few decades have we begun to really plumbits depths from why we sleep in the first place, to what goes on in our brains whenwe do, to what happens when we can't sleep. And there is a lot that science has to sayabout your dreams! Talk about weird! It's like Sigmund Freudmeets Neil Gaiman. So, even though it may seem like you'redead to the world, when you sleep, your perceptual window remains slightly open.

And kinda like Mike Birbiglia's hotel roomwindow, a trip through it can make for a pretty wild ride. But for your safety and enjoyment, I'm hereto guide you through this state of consciousness, where you'll learn more than a few thingsabout human mind, including your own. And here's hoping you won't need any stitcheswhen we're through. INTRO Technically speaking, sleep is a periodic,natural, reversible and near total loss of consciousness, meaning it's different thanhibernation, being in a coma, or in say, an

anesthetic oblivion. Although we spend about a third of our livessleeping, and we know that it's essential to our health and survival, there still isn'ta scientific consensus for why we do it. Part of it probably has to do with simplerecuperation, allowing our neurons and other cells to rest and repair themselves. Sleepalso supports growth, because that's when our pituitary glands release growth hormones,which is why babies sleep all the time. Plus, sleep has all kinds of benefits for mentalfunction, like improving memory, giving our brains time to process the events of the day,and boosting our creativity.

But even if we're not quite sure of allthe reasons why we sleep, technology has given us great insight into how we sleep. And for that we can thank little Armond Aserinsky.One night in early 1950s Chicago, eightyearold Armond was tucked into his bed by his father.But this night, instead of getting a kiss on the forehead, little Armond got some electrodestaped to his face. Armond's dad was Eugene Aserinsky, a gradstudent looking to test out a new electroencephalograph, or EEG machine, that measures the brain'selectrical activity. That night, as his son slept peacefully, hewatched the machine go bonkers with brain

wave patterns, and after making sure thathis machine wasn't somehow broken discovered that the brain doesn't just quot;power downquot;during sleep, as most scientists thought. Instead, he had discovered the sleep stagewe now call REM or rapid eye movement, a perplexing period when the sleeping brain is buzzingwith activity, even though the body is in a deep slumber. Aserinsky and his colleague Nathaniel Kleitmanwent on to become pioneers of sleep research. Since then, sleep specialists armed with similartechnology have shown that we experience four distinct stages of sleep, each defined byunique brainwave patterns.

Female Viagra New Insights Into Narcolepsy

You and I are in a lot of ways just bubbling cauldrens of chemicals A whole lot of what we think and feel and experience during the day is the result of chemical compounds binding with tiny receptors all over our bodies making us feel excited, scared, anxious or maybe just sleepy And in the past couple of weeks research has offered some new insights into our biochemistry Take the recent news that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may soon for the first time approve a drug designed specifically to cause sexual arousal Last month an advisory panel recommended that the FDA greenlight a proposed drug called Flibanserin

which is said to increase sexual desire in premenopausal women It's been described in the media as quot;Viagra for womenquot; which it isn't really, mainly because Viagra doesn't actually affect a man's sex drive Instead, it and other drugs like it are vasodilators compounds that relax blood vessels to stimulate blood flow They just help make erections possible when men are arosued But Flibanserin supposedly acts on the sex drive itself helping to stimulate arousal in otherwise healthy women who feel little or no sexual desire

The company behind the drug called Sprout told the FDA that it doesn't exactly know how Flibanserin works But it seems to act partly as an agonist, or a chemical that imitates the body's own signalling chemicals In this case, they say it binds to receptors in the brain that are typically triggered by dopamine and norepinphrine, two of the more famously stimulating neurotransmitters, that your body releases when you're excited and generally aroused At the same time, the drug also seems to act as an antagonist,

or blocker of neurotransmitter that inhibit excitement particularly serotonin, which regulates your sleep cycle Some groups have praised the approval of the drug because they say it closes a gender gap in sexual medicine While Viagra and lots of other medications are available for male sexual health there is nothing on the market that does the same for females But, the results of the trials of Flibanserin are only slightly better than placebos Which could explain that there are side effects

that come with altering your brain's chemistry And in the drugs trials the most common were: low blood pressure, dizziness and syncope (or the loss of consciousness) particularly in women who drink alcohol The final decision on Flibanserin will be made in August Meanwhile, in some other research into our biochemistry is shedding light on an unusual outbreak: an outbreak of nacrolepsy Its most common symptom is a rather terrifying condition known as cataplexy,

in which a patient's voluntary muscle control briefly stops resulting in anything from drooping eyelids, to total physical collapse And it's typically triggered by strong emotions whether it's a fit of anger, or fear, or even a big, strong bellylaugh But in Europe, many physicians noticed that cases of narcolepsy started to increase in 2009, with about 1,300 cases being reported during the outbreak of the H1N1 'flu And last week, a team of biologists said they may have found the possible cause: a vaccine that was supposed to prevent the 'flu

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