What Is Healthy Sleeping Habits

By | May 31, 2017

Natural Cures for Insomnia

Hey guys, Axe here from DrAxe . Oneof the most common things I'll hear from my patients, is they'll say, quot; Axe, I can'tsleep.quot; And if you're one of those people that have trouble falling asleep, or strugglewith insomnia, or you wake up during the night, that's very common. In this tutorial I'm goingto go through the exact steps you need to follow to get better quality of sleep andto help you fall asleep fast. Step number one in overcoming sleep deprivationis to change your diet, surprisingly. And, for a lot of people, their diets are keepingthem from falling asleep. Before you go to bed, you need to really drop your carbohydrateconsumption. If you're consuming too many

sugars and carbs, your body is burning those,it's getting warm. And so, lowering that sugar, and grain intake, and carbohydrate intakebefore bed is important. And get some good quality fats before you go to bed. Somethinglike an avocado is a great food to actually help you fall asleep at night, either avocadoor some organic yogurt. So again, avocado and organic yogurt, are the best foods tohelp you naturally fall asleep. The reason they work is those foods are high in magnesiumand potassium. Magnesium and potassium are two crucial nutrients you need to help relaxthe body and to help you fall asleep at night. So remember avocado and yogurt, the top twofoods you can consume just a little bit here

or there in the evening that will help youfall asleep at night. The second step you need to do to overcomeinsomnia is to reduce stress. And for most people, along with diet, this is the big thingthat's keeping you up at night, is your mind starts racing, you keep thinking and you can'tshut your brain off. And there are several reasons for that. One, is you watched TV upuntil the point that you went to bed. That visual stimulus you're watching constantly,especially the blue light, and that doesn't just include the TV screen, it also includesyour computer, your iPad, or your phone. And that light is blue light, which actually tellsyour pineal gland in your brain that it actually

needs to keep running, so it messes with yourcircadian rhythms and cortisol levels. It keeps you from falling asleep at night whenyou were looking at that bright blue light in the computer screens and TV screens. So,about 30 minutes at least, ideally, an hour, but at least 30 minutes before bed, you needto shut off all electronics, and you need to start reading something that helps yourelax. Or start journaling. So you can get out ajournal and start writing things down. You can look at your schedule for the next dayand write that down. But I really recommend reading a novel that you enjoy, reading adevotional, your Bible, or just something

that helps you relax and wind down at least30 minutes before bed. And that's going to help, and in general reducing stress. And if you have something that's really stressingyou out, that's keeping you from sleeping at night, I recommend you start writing downthose things that stress you out. Work on addressing those the best you can, and thenstart scheduling things into the week that you love to do. It is so important. If you'vehad a great day, and you've been happy all day, it actually creates certain hormonesin your body known as endorphins that actually help you fall asleep at night. So actually,having a good mood throughout the day can

help improve your sleep at night. So stepnumber two, shut down the computers and read a book before bed. As well as just add somejoy into your life. Reduce stress; it's very important for falling asleep at night. Step number three, is take quality supplements,especially a magnesium supplement. And taking a magnesium supplement, about 400 to 500mga night before bed, can help you naturally reduce stress, and really improve sleep. Andso I recommend a high quality magnesium chelate or magnesium citrate before bed. So takinga magnesium supplement can help you fall asleep. Also supplements like melatonin can help,or valerian root. But I don't recommend doing

How Much Sleep Do You Actually Need

Tiredé We all know the feeling; irritable, groggy and exceptionally lazy. Chances are you didn't sleep enough last night, or the past few nights. But what exactly is quot;enough sleepéquot; And more importantly, can you ever quot;catch upquot; on ité While the very function of sleep is still debated by scientists, we do know that it's necessary to function efficiently and productively. After all, we spend 24 years of our lifetime sleeping, it had better be important. Researchers have tested how much is required each night by assigning groups of people to four, five, and eight hours of sleep over extended periods of time. After 14 days, those with eight hours of sleep exhibited few attention lapses of cognitive

issues; however, those with six or four hours of sleep showed a steady decline. In fact, after only two weeks, the six hour group showed a similar reaction time to a person with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.1%, which is considered legally drunk. The four hour sleepers suffered even more, occasionally falling asleep during their cognitive tests. In both groups, brain function decreased day by day, almost linearly with no sign of leveling off. Scientists have dubbed this cumulative effect as sleep debt. So can we recover from ité After a night or two of little sleep, studies show that the body and brain can fully recover with a few nights of good sleep. However, with long term sleep deprivation on the scale

of weeks to months, the recovery of cognitive function is much slower, requiring many more nights of quality sleep. On the timescale of months to years, it is unknown whether brain function can be fully repaired, or if it causes permanent damage. Paradoxically, with chronic sleep deprivation, your sleepiness or how tired you feel does eventually level off, meaning that you become less and less aware of your objective impairment over time. So how long should you sleepé Most studies tend to show that seven to eight hours of sleep is the average ideal for humans. Apart from the cognitive issues, individuals who consistently sleep less than seven hours a night have an increased risk of heart disease, obesity and diabetes,

not to mention a 12% higher risk of death. On the flip side, studies have shown that while sleeping more than eight hours does not impair brain function, it also carries an increased risk of heart disease, obesity and diabetes, and a 30% increased risk of mortality! So too much sleep may also be a bad thing. But variation most certainly exists, and our genetics play a large role. In fact, individuals genuinely unaffected by only six hours of sleep were found to have a mutation of a specific gene. When scientists genetically engineered mice to express this gene, they were able to stay awake for an extra 1.2 hours than normal mice. It turns out these short sleepers

have more biologically intense sleep sessions than the average person. Ultimately, while it's important to know the ideal average of seven to eight hours exists, let your body and brain help you figure out its own needs. After all, no one shoe size fits all. If you want to know how to get better quality sleep each night in order to conquer the hurdles of sleep deprivation, we have some tips and research for you over on ASAPThought. You can find a link in the description below to that tutorial. Thanks to Audible for giving you a free audio book of your choice at audible asap. Audible is the leading provider of audio books with over 150,000 downloadable titles across

all types of literature. We recommend the 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series, which the Game of Thrones TV show is based off of. It's kept us up through the nights and caused a lot of lost sleep! You can download this audio book or another of your choice for free at audible asap. And with a subscription you can get one free book a month, so you can read the whole series! Special thanks to Audible for making these tutorials possible. And subscribe for more weekly science tutorials!.

8 Strange Animal Sleeping Habits

Sleep. We all need it, and we spend about a thirdof our lives doing it. Scientists aren't totally sure why we needto sleep, though they do have a few good guesses. It's obviously an important biological function,because practically every single animal needs to sleep in some form or another. But since it isn't always practical forsome species to just conk out for 8 hours, a lot of animals have evolved some cleverworkarounds. 1.

Sleeping Standing Up Large animals like horses, elephants, andrhinos can be pretty vulnerable. They live on the open plains, and they'reso big that they're very visible. They have to be prepared to run basicallywhenever, which makes it dangerous for them to lay down to sleep. So, many of these bigger herbivores have developedmechanisms that allow them to doze on their feet, thanks to something called a stay apparatus. That's a system of ligaments and tendonsthat can lock into place so they don't have

to actively use their muscles to stand upright. Some species, like horses, do need to laydown for REM sleep, the deepest kind of sleep. This is where being a herd animal comes inhandy. While a few animals are lying down to catchsome REM sleep, others are sleeping on their feet. By distributing the two kinds of sleep acrossthe herd, large herbivores can guarantee that the group is ready to react to danger, butits members can also take turns getting deep sleep.

2. Sleeping Very Little Like horses and other large herbivores, giraffessleep standing up. But that's not what makes them so interesting. As it turns out, giraffes get very littlesleep. Researchers observing giraffes in captivityfound that adult giraffes get less than five hours of sleep per day. Like horses, giraffes will sometimes lay downto catch some a little deep sleep, twisting

their neck around to rest it on their rumplike a pillow. But they only do this for a few minutes ata time, and less often once they've reached adulthood. Researchers aren't sure how these huge animalscan get away with such short naps, but it's probably an evolutionary advantage. Sleeping less means they spend more time alertand aware of their surroundings and less time unconconscious and at risk of being attackedby predators. It could also be necessary.

Since giraffes are both vegetarians and enormous,they have to eat a lot—up to 37 kilograms of leaves per day. And it takes a long time to eat that muchfood! 3. Sleeping in Flight Frigatebirds lead pretty intense lives. Like some other birds — swifts, for example— they can fly for weeks without stopping. And they can sleep at the same time!

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