What Is The Opposite Of Sleep Insomnia

By | May 23, 2018

Sleep Better with These 5 Natural Sleep Remedies

Is falling asleep a struggleé Can't sleepat nighté It needn't be. Find out how you could sleep better naturallywith these 5 subtle changes to your bedtime routine.Stay tuned. Many of the bedtime rituals habits thatwe've established for ourselves are not conducive to getting a good night's rest.How you feel the next day during your waking hours hinges greatly on how well you sleep.By learning how to avoid common sleep enemies trying out a variety of healthy sleeppromotingtechniques, you'll eventually develop your personal routine to a good night's sleep.Let's take a look at how we can accomplish

this by creating your magical hour beforelights out. The solution to falling asleep quickly gettinga restful sleep does not boil down to just one thing or strategy.I wish it were that simple. It's a combination of factors or positivehabits that you gradually introduce into your current sleep routine over time thatsend you into lala land faster. In essence you're layering several strategieson top of each other in order to augment accelerate the positive sleep effect.With the goal of getting a restful sleep that recharges the body, clears the mind decreasesyour morning fatigue, let's take a look at

those 5 natural sleep remedies.But before I do that allow me to take a moment to explain the role of melatonin productionin establishing your body's natural sleepwake cycle.Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure.Your brain secretes more of it in the evening when it's dark to make you sleepy.And less during the day when it's light out you'd like to stay awake alert.So let's see how you could naturally increase your melatonin levels by making a few subtlechanges to your sleep routine. Here are those 5 strategies to incorporateinto your magical hour before lights out:

Strategy 1 is to turn off all light emittingelectronic devices at least an hour before bedtime.This includes your TV, computer, tablet smart phone.Many of us watch TV or work on the computer to relax at the end of the day.This is a big mistake right before bedtime. Not only does the light suppress your naturalmelatonin production, but these devices actually electrically stimulate the mind rather thanrelaxing it. If your favorite TV show is late at night,consider recording it then viewing it earlier the next day.Strategy 2.

As an alternative to TV watching, try listeningto some soft music or a fiction audio book instead.The soft music helps to set a calming mood. And listening to an audio book can be relaxing.Just ensure that it's a fiction story that requires little cognitive analysis as opposedto a recording that may require excessive processing.Which brings us to strategy 3 Piggy backing off of the previous tip, readingprior to lights out is yet another sleep remedy to consider trying.Spending 15 to 30 minutes losing yourself in a good book can take your mind off theday's stressful events.

I love to unwind at the end of my day withmy Kindle reader. As a side note, avoid reading from a backlitdevice at night such as an iPad. Tablets emit light which suppresses your naturalproduction of melatonin. Using an eReader such as a Kindle which isnot backlit is a better choice. Not into readingéHow about spending some time doing some relaxation exercises or meditation to help calm the mindéOr how journaling in your personal diary jotting down either what you were grateful for thatday or a personal success story that brings about a sense of peace contentmentéStrategy 4.

Trouble in Bed When Sleep Turns Against Us

Say you've been napping, like between classes, or after a long night out, or, I don't know, after broadcasting on YouTube for 48 straight hours to raise money for charity. Now, imagine you waking up, and suddenly you discover that you can't move. You want to speak, but you can't; you're mind is acutely aware of what's happening, but you are powerless to get your body to do anything. It may last a few seconds, it may last a few minutes, in rare cases it can last more than an hour it's called Sleep Paralysis and you might not have to imagine it

because up to 40% of us have experienced this sleep disorder at some point in our lives. I am one of them. We don't like to think about the bad things that can go on while we're in dreamland just as we hate the disorders that keep us from even falling asleep Hello, Insomnia. But even though we've talked a lot on this show about the science of sleep Why we need it Why we dream

and where dreams come from. There is a whole other polymorphously messed up realm of human biology that explains what happens when sleeps turns against us. We can't turn our brains off. We forget to breathe. We have waking hallucinations. Some of us even walk, eat, run, and have entire conversations when we're asleep. The halfasleep brain is a crazy place

and once you understand it, you may never see the back of your eyelids the same way again. (intro music) When most people think of the things that cramp our sleep style they think, Insomnia. But defining, diagnosing, and treating this most common sleep disorder can be tricky. In fact, for a long time, most scientists considered insomnia to be a symptom of another problem like depression, anxiety, asthma, stress, substance abuse, a traumatic injury even jetlag Though, today, insomnia is considered by many to be a chronic disease of its own

that interacts with other medical conditions So, if you've ever had prolonged trouble falling asleep, or staying asleep but you don't have any other health issues then s would probably say that you have Primary Insomnia. If you do have something else going on, like a physical or psychological condition then you've got Secondary Insomnia. And most cases of Secondary Insomnia are chronic meaning it lasts for more than a month.

There are also cases of Acute or shortterm Insomnia which is usually triggered by stress or some specific life event Whatever the cause scientists believe these Insomnias are the result of the simple but eternal struggle between arousal and sleepiness. More and more research is suggesting that a condition known as HyperArousal where the nervous system remains in a constant state of alert may be the main reason for chronic insomnia.

What If You Stopped Sleeping

Ahhh. Sleep! You can never have enough of it, it seems. In fact, sometimes it literally feels like you aren't getting enough, but what if you stopped sleeping all togetheré Strangely, science understands relatively little about why we sleep or how it evolved in the first place. After all, laying unconscious and dormant for hours on end while predators lurk hardly seems advantageous or smart. But, we have discovered a few correlations. For example, adults who sleep between 6 to 8 hours a night tend to live longer. Excess of sleep, however can lead to medical problems including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Similarly, chronic sleep deprivation has been linked to aspects of cardiovascular disease, obesity, depression and even brain damage.

But what if you stopped sleeping right nowé Well, after your first sleepless night your mesolimbic system becomes stimulated and dopamine runs rampant. And this may actually trigger some extra energy, motivation, positivity, and even sex drive. Sounds appealing, but its a slippery slope. Your brain slowly begins to shut off the regions responsible for planning and evaluating decisions, leading to more impulsive behavior. Once exhaustion sets in, you'll find yourself with slower reaction times reduced perceptual and cognitive functions. After a day or two of no sleep, the body loses its ability to properly metabolize glucose and the immune system stops working as well. In some cases, 3 days of no sleep has lead to hallucinations.

Care about how you looké Studies have shown that direct correlation between sleep deprivation and a person's perceived beauty, that is to say, sleepdeprived individuals appeared less healthy and less attractive than when they were wellrested. The longest scientifically documented case of being awake was 264 hours or 11 days. And while they did develop problems with concentration, perception and irritability, the surprising truth is that they suffered no serious long term health effects. In fact, no individuals under these documented conditions experienced medical, physiological, neurological or psychiatric problems. But there are limited studies, and this doesn't mean permanent damage couldn't be inflicted with more time. Sleep deprivation experiments on rats for example, generally lead to death after about 2 weeks. But, scientists aren't totally sure if there dying from the lack of sleep or from the stress of constantly being woken up. Perhaps you should look at fatal familial insomnia for an answer.

A rare genetic disease of the brain which causes progressively worsening insomnia or sleeplessness leading to hallucinations, dementia and ultimately, death. This disease is only affected around 100 people in the world, but their average survival span was around 18 months. Over time, the lack of sleep becomes worse and the body's organs begin to shut down. So, while a lack of sleep won't necessarily kill you quickly, continual sleep deprivation will have a negative effect on your body. Sleep tight, but not too much! Got a burning question you want answeredé Ask it in the comments or in Facebook and Twitter, and if you can't get enough science in your life, check out the ScienceAlert Facebook page, which is one of the best out there to keep you up to date and entertained with the latest news and breakthroughs. And subscribe to AsapSCIENCE for more weekly science tutorials!

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